Featured article #26

War Notes and News

Private W. J. Woodman, of No.1 Company, 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, writing to his mother at 195, Algernon Road, Lewisham, from the front, on April 9th, says: “I hope by the time you receive this that we shall have had a go at the Huns. Our bombs are causing some terrible havoc amongst them. The other day, when we were only 55 yards distant, we threw some rifle grenades at them, which made them dodge up a communication trench, on which we shortly afterwards fired, three trench mortar bombs and three on the firing-line. We caught them in a trap, and, my word, you should have heard the pretty names they called us. For every one they fire we usually fire three; that seems the only way to keep them quiet. The weather this month has been very wet… Food is about the same; the only fault is that we do not get enough bread. In front of us, there is a line of dead Germans, and every time we fire a rifle the bullet usually goes through these poor men. Last Thursday the Germans gave us a musical evening, and we enjoyed it, as they sang very well. The Irish Guards returned the compliment on Good Friday by singing some Irish songs. On Easter Monday we were in the trenches again, and we had steak and potatoes, which we usually have in this section. I have just received your hot cross buns – a week late.”

Kentish Mercury, April 23 1915 ([/War Notes and News

Private W. J. Woodman, of No.1 Company, 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, writing to his mother at 195, Algernon Road, Lewisham, from the front, on April 9th, says: “I hope by the time you receive this that we shall have had a go at the Huns. Our bombs are causing some terrible havoc amongst them. The other day, when we were only 55 yards distant, we threw some rifle grenades at them, which made them dodge up a communication trench, on which we shortly afterwards fired, three trench mortar bombs and three on the firing-line. We caught them in a trap, and, my word, you should have heard the pretty names they called us. For every one they fire we usually fire three; that seems the only way to keep them quiet. The weather this month has been very wet… Food is about the same; the only fault is that we do not get enough bread. In front of us, there is a line of dead Germans, and every time we fire a rifle the bullet usually goes through these poor men. Last Thursday the Germans gave us a musical evening, and we enjoyed it, as they sang very well. The Irish Guards returned the compliment on Good Friday by singing some Irish songs. On Easter Monday we were in the trenches again, and we had steak and potatoes, which we usually have in this section. I have just received your hot cross buns – a week late.”

Kentish Mercury, April 23 1915 view original])

Included page "war" does not exist (create it now)

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License